Judge Conrad Hollenbeck 1847-1915


From "History of Nebraska"

HOLLENBECK, JUDGE CONRAD, son of John and Emily (Parker) Hollenbeck, was born upon his father's farm at Hebron, Potter county, Pa., Nov. 19, 1847. His great-grandfather came from Holland in his youth and settled in Coxsackie, Greene county, N. Y. There he was married, and left a son, Conrad Hollenbeck, who lived to the unusual age of 106 years. He is buried at Sweden Valley, Potter county, Pa. Conrad Hollenbeck was married in Cortland county, N. Y., to Rebecca Edwards, and his son, John, became a prosperous farmer at Hebron, Pa., to which place he removed after his marriage to Emily Parker, a native of Virgil, Cortland county, N. Y. After attending the district schools of his native county, Conrad Hollenbeck was graduated from Mansfield (Pa.) college in June, 1869, and then began the study of law in the office of Isaac Benson at Coudersport, Pa. He was admitted to the bar in 1871, and for about six years practiced his profession at Coudersport. From his childhood Conrad Hollenbeck was bred to habits of industry and thrift. He earned his first dollar when but nine years old by building fires for the teacher at the country school which he attended, and during his school years he assisted in the work upon his father's farm. In the spring of 1864, at the age of sixteen, he enlisted at Williamsport, Pa., in the 207th Regt. Pa. Vols. as a private, and participated in all of the battles of the Army of the Potomac from the Battle of the Wilderness to the surrender of Lee. He was married May 9, 1877, to Jannett Knox at Coudersport, and at once started west, settling in the same month at Fremont, Neb., which has ever since been his home. He has always been a democrat. He was a member of the legislature of Pennsylvania in 1874 and 1876. In 1890 he , was elected county attorney of Dodge county, continuing in the office until 1895; was a delegate in 1896 to the Democratic national convention at Chicago, and in 1898 he was elected judge of the 6th judicial district, which office he still holds. In the fall of 1901 he was the candidate of the fusionists for judge of the supreme court of Nebraska, but was defeated at the election with the rest of his ticket. His long tenure of important judicial offices attests the high public esteem which he enjoys. Judge and Mrs. Hollenbeck have one son living. Franklin Knox Hollenbeck, who was born in Fremont, June 18, 1878. He is a graduate of the Fremont high school, and of St. John's Military school at Manlius, N. Y., and is a member of the class of 1900 in the law department of the Nebraska state University. He was married in 1905 to Mae P. Alexander of Forsyth, Mont. He is now the owner of a bank at Harrisburg, Neb.

Obit from Schuyler Messenger 1/22/1915: Judge Hollenbeck Dead - "..judge of the supreme court of the state..."

From Nebraska Ancestree: ...came to Dodge County, Nebraska in 1877...married Janet Knox on May 9, 1877 ... born East Hebron, PA on November 19, 1847

Judge Conrad Hollenbeck Photo

Biographical sketch for Judge Hollenbeck's wife, Jannette Knox Hollenbeck from "History of Nebraska"

HOLLENBECK, MRS. JANNETT (KNOX) , Fremont, Neb., wife of Judge Conrad Hollenbeck, and a daughter of Franklin William and Catherine (Johnson) Knox, was born at Lisle, Broome county, N. Y., Apr. 21, 1856. Her father, Franiklin William Knox, a lawyer and railroad president, died at his winter home in Charlottesville, Va., in 1891. He was one of the leading lawyers of Coudersport, Pa., for forty-seven years, and for several years was a prominent railroad attorney. Her mother, Catherine Johnson in maidenhood, was born in Lisle, N. Y., was a graduate of the Homer academy, Cortland, N. Y., and died in 1869. John Johnson, the great-grandfather of Mrs. Hollenbeck, was born in Connecticut, and served seven years in the Revolutionary war as lieutenant and captain, was at Valley Forge with Washington, and became a pensioned Revolutionary officer. He married Clarissa Rock. His son, Cyrus Johnson, the grandfather of Mrs. Hollenbeck, was a captain in the War of 1812, a member of the legislature of New York state, and a successful merchant in Lisle, N. Y. His wife was Abagah Wheeler, a granddaughter of a French physician by the name of Quigley, who accompanied General Lafayette to America. An uncle of Mrs. Hollenbeck was a captain in the Civil war, thus making three generations of captains in the military service of the United States. On her father's side Mrs. Hollenbeck is also descended from a long line of distinguished ancestry. William Knox, her great-grandfather, married Margaret Colton, and was sent by the state of Connecticut to Pennsylvania, and a block house was built for him on the site of what is now Knoxville, Tioga county, which town was named in his honor. His son, James Knox, was the first child born in Tioga county, and married Ann Faulkner. who was born in Otsego county, N. Y., in 1798. Franklin W. Knox, Mrs. Hollenbeck's father, was also born in this block house, and lived there until one year old. This land is still held by great-grandsons of William Knox, and none of it has ever passed out of the family. Judge John C. Knox, of Philadelphia, prominent as a lawyer and jurist, is a member of this family. The Knox family came originally from Scotland, and seven generations have been born in America. Mrs. Hollenbeck was educated in a private school and Coudersport (Pa.) academy, finishing at the Pennsylvania Female college, Collegeville, Pa. She settled in Fremont, Neb., in May, 1877, with her husband, Conrad Hollenbeck, whom she had married in Coudersport, Pa., May, 9 of that year. Two children have been born to them: Franklin Knox Hollenbeck, born June 18, 1878, and Oscar Lowry Hollenbeck, born Sept. 13, 1884, died Dec. 1, 1885. Mrs. Hollenbeck has a wide acquaintance, especially among the women of the state, and is prominent in the civic and social life of Fremont, where she has so long resided. She was a member of the woman's board in the management of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition at Omaha in 1898, as the representative of the 3d congressional district. She has been a member of the charity club for ten years, and served as president, secretary, and vice-president. As a member of the woman's club she has served as second vice-president, chairman of the executive, program, and social committees. She is also a member of the D. A. R., has served three years as regent, also as state vice-president and secretary. She organized the Lewis and Clark chapter at Fremont.

The following obituary was provided by Mrs. C. Ann Benham, the granddaughter of Judge Conrad Hollenbeck:

Newspaper Obituaries Received from Potter County Pa. Historical Society.

February 17, 1927

Word received Tuesday morning, February 15th 1927 of death of Mrs. Nettie Hollenbeck at her home, Fremont Nebraska. she contracted grippe about two weeks ago which resulted in her death. Daughter of Franklin William and Catherine (Johnson) Knox. Born April 21, 1856 at the home of her grandmother and grandfather Johnson at Lisle, Broome county, N.Y. Brought to Coudersport when two months old where she lived during her girlhood. Received her education at the old academy on the hill and at a seminary for girls at Collegeville, Pennsylvania. On March 9, 1877 married Hon. Conrad Hollenbeck and left immediately for the West. After traveling for some time, located in Fremont, Neb. Had two children, Frank Knox Hollenbeck, now a lawyer in Fremont, and Oscar Lowry Hollenbeck who died in infancy. In 1888 Mrs. Hollenbeck came east and engaged in millinery business in Coudersport until the spring of 1894 when she sold her business to Miss A. Blanche Cummings and returned to Fremont. Is survived by one son and six grandchildren. One sister, Mrs. James G. Covey, of Coudersport; two brothers, James L. and Franklin D. Knox. Funeral February 17, at Fremont.

The following biographical information and obituaries were kindly provided by Mrs. C. Ann Benham, a granddaughter of Judge Conrad Hollenbeck:

HISTORY OF DODGE AND WASHINGTON COUNTIES, NEBRASKA
The American Historical Society, Chicago 1921

JUDGE CONRAD HOLLENBECK, a resident of Dodge County almost two score years, was during a large part of that time judge of the Sixth Judicial District, and the distinctions achieved by him as an able lawyer, a profound Jurist and a man of affairs made him one of the State's best known citizens.

The late Judge Hollenbeck was born at East Hebron, Potter County, Pennsylvania, November 19, 1847. His first American ancestor, his great-grandfather, came from Holland when a young man and settled at Coxsackie, Greene County, New York, where he married. His son Conrad Hollenbeck, lived to the unusual age of 104 years and is buried at Sweden Valley in Potter County, Pennsylvania. This Conrad Hollenbeck was married in Courtland County, New York, to Rebecca Edwards. Their son, John Hollenbeck, became a prosperous farmer in Hebron Pennsylvania, whither he removed after his marriage with Emily Parker, a native of Virgil, Courtland County, New York.

A son of John and Emily(Parker) Hollenbeck, Conrad Hollenbeck grew up in a home equally removed from poverty and from luxury and his training was such as to bring out the sturdy and self reliant qualities of his character. He attended a district school, and at the age of nine years earned his first money building fires for the school teacher. He worked on his father's farm, and in the spring of 1864 before he was seventeen years of age he enlisted as a private at Williamsport, Pennsylvania, in the 207th Pennsylvania Infantry. He was in the great Battle of the Wilderness and with the army of the Potomac until Lee's surrender. After the war he resumed his education and in June, 1869, graduated from the college at Mansfield, Pennsylvania. He took up the study of law in the office of Isaac Benson at Coudersport, Pennsylvania, was admitted to the bar in 1871 and remained there in active practice for six years. While in Pennsylvania he gained his first recognition as a public leader, being elected to the Legislature in 1874 and again in 1876.

May 9, 1877, he married Janet Knox at Coudersport. Their wedding journey brought them out to Nebraska and they arrived in Fremont on the 15th of May. Judge Hollenbeck came to Dodge County with a proved record as a lawyer and was not long in securing a position of advantage and influence in the bar of this State. After some years of private practice he was elected county attorney in 1890, and held that office until 1895. In 1896 he sat as a delegate in the Chicago National Convention, where Bryan was first nominated. Two years later in 1898 he was elevated to the bench as judge of the Sixth Judicial District and discharged the duties of that position with eminent abilities for eighteen years. He was elected chief justice of Nebraska in 1914 and served until his death on January 21, 1915, in Lincoln, Nebraska, holding court only five days before he died.

Judge and Mrs. Hollenbeck had two children: Franklin Knox, born June 18, 1878: and Oscar Lowry, born September 13, 1884, and died in 1885.

The only son now living graduated from Fremont High School and the University of Nebraska in the Law Department and was married November 15, 1905, to Mae B. Alexander, daughter of a prominent Montana rancher and business man of Forsyth, Montana, where Franklin K. Hollenbeck now lives. They have five children: Thomas Alexander, Janet K., Gretchen L,. Prudence J. and John Conrad. (NOTE: I was not born yet when this article was written) At the time of his marriage Franklin K. Hollenbeck was city treasurer of Fremont. He also conducted a bank at Harrisburg and is now postmaster of Forsyth, Montana.


(From the Lincoln paper of Jan. 21, 1915)

JUDGE HOLLENBECK CALLED TO REST


CHIEF JUSTICE OF SUPREME COURT DIES SUDDENLY OF HEART TROUBLE

WELL KNOWN NEBRASKA JURIST WAS INAUGURATED BUT TWO WEEKS AGO

Judge Conrad Hollenbeck, chief justice of the supreme court of Nebraska died at the Lincoln hotel at 2:00 o’clock this morning. Heart disease of long standing was the cause of death which was rather unexpected. He had been ill nearly a year, and was forced for two months last summer to leave the bench in the Sixth district. Later he recovered sufficiently to make the campaign for the supreme bench. Although loath to enter the race, he was finally persuaded to by his friends.

Judge Hollenbeck had served as supreme judge just two weeks, being inaugurated January 7. He came to Lincoln from Fremont, in the Sixth Judicial district, where he had been judge sixteen years. He was one of the best known jurists in the state. He was 67 years old.

Illness of Long Standing

Though not in the best of health, Judge Hollenbeck did not consider himself to be in serious condition. Since his sickness last summer he had not been as strong as for common, but he passed through the campaign last fall with apparently no ill effects. His old trouble of Bright’s disease and liver trouble had made its appearance in light form again, and he retired to the Lincoln sanitarium last Saturday to rest for a couple of days. Monday evening he went back to his rooms at the hotel feeling better. Wednesday about midnight Judge Hollenbeck felt pains about his heart. His physician Dr. C. C. Moyer, was called, but he expired shortly after 2 o’clock. Death was pronounced due to valvular heart trouble.

Was Widely Known

Judge Hollenbeck was known throughout the state, not only as a member of the legal profession, a lawyer and a jurist, but as a man of affairs. As the county attorney of Dodge county he gained fame as a prosecutor, and later as a judge his fame spread as a jurist. After several years as a practitioner, Judge Hollenbeck was elected to county attorney of Dodge county, which office he held two terms. He went to the district bench in 1898 and was re-elected seven times. In the campaign for supreme Justice last fall, Judge Hollenbeck received more than 60 per cent of the vote of his county and almost that great for his district, where there were five other candidates in the race. He was very popular and highly loved by those who knew him personally.

Sketch of His Life

Judge Conrad Hollenbeck, son of John and Emily (Parker) Hollenbeck was born upon his father’s farm in Hebron, Potter county, Pennsylvania, November 19, 1847. His great-grandfather came from Holland in his youth and settled in Coxsackie, Greene county, New York. There he was married and left a son, Conrad Hollenbeck, who lived to the unusual age of 106 years. He is buried at Sweden Valley, Potter County, Pennsylvania. Conrad Hollenbeck was married in Courtland county, New York, to Rebecca Edwards and his son, John became a prosperous farmer at Hebron Pa., to which place he removed after his marriage to Emily Parker, a native of Virgil, Cortland county, New York.

After attending the district schools of his native county, Conrad Hollenbeck was graduated from Mansfield (Pa.) college in June, 1869, and then began the study of law in the office of Isaac Benson at Coudersport, Pa. He was admitted to the bar in 1871, and for about six years practiced his profession at Coudersport. From his childhood Conrad Hollenbeck was bred to habits of industry and thrift. He earned his first dollar when but 9 years old by building fires for the teacher at the country school which he attended, and during his school years he assisted in the work upon his father’s farm. In the spring of 1864, at the age of 16, he enlisted at Williamsport, Pa. in the Two Hundred and Seventh regiment, Pennsylvania volunteers, as a private, and participated in all of the battles of the Army of the Potomac from the battle of the Wilderness to the surrender of Lee.

Moved West in ‘77

He was married May 9, 1877, to Janet Knox at Coudersport, and at once started west, settling in the same month at Fremont, Ne., which has ever since been his home. He has always been a democrat. He was a member of the legislature of Pennsylvania in 1874 and 1876. In 1890 he was elected county attorney of Dodge county, continuing in the office until 1895; was a delegate in 1896 to the democratic national convention at Chicago, and in 1898 he was elected judge of the Sixth judicial district which office he held until his election to the supreme bench. In the fall of 1901 he was the candidate of the fusionists for judge of the supreme court of Nebraska, but was defeated at the election with the rest of his ticket. His long tenure of important Judicial offices attests the high public esteem which he enjoys.

Judge and Mrs. Hollenbeck have one son living, Franklin Knox Hollenbeck who was born in Fremont June 18, 1878. He is a graduate of the Fremont high school and of St. John’s Military school at Manlius, N. Y., and is a member of the class of 1900 in the law department of the Nebraska state university. He was married in 1905 to Mar B. Alexander of Forsyth, Mont. He is also the owner of a bank at Harrisburg, Neb.

In point of service Judge Hollenbeck was one of the two oldest district judges in the state. He and Judge Westover of Rushville have been on the bench for more than fifteen years.

The Hollenbecks have resided in Fremont since coming to this state in 1877. Mrs. Hollenbeck is a prominent member of the D.A.R.

Tributes of Friends

Grant Martio, former attorney general said of Judge Hollenbeck: "I knew Judge Hollenbeck as a practitioner, county attorney and district judge nearly twenty-five years. He was considered a man of more than ordinary judgment. As a Lawyer, as county attorney, and as district judge he proved himself a superior man. He was famous before he became a prosecutor, and became more famous as a prosecutor. As district judge, he was unbiased, considerate and well balanced at all times. He made friends and kept them, and by all was highly esteemed."

"Judge Hollenbeck was loved by all who knew him." said Ross Hammond, Fremont editor. "He was one of the nicest neighbors I ever knew. His even temperament, his unbiased judgment, and his high standard of character, made him a man among men. His popularity was evidenced by his almost unanimous vote which he received in his county and district for supreme Justice. In the thirty-seven of the thirty-eight years which I knew him, he rose from a common probationer to the almost highest office of his profession: As a worker and a man, he had the highest regards of his fellowman."

H. H. Wilson, prominent attorney said: "I have known Judge Hollenbeck for the last twenty-five years as one of the forceful lawyers of the state. In recent years I have tried several cases before him and learned to admire his judicial ability and sterling integrity. He was a man well grounded in the general principles of the law, by which he was inclined to be guided, rather than particular decisions. A long and successful practice as a member of the bar, as well as his shorter judicial career on the district bench, won the confidence especially of the people in his district, a confidence well merited by his character, industry and probity. His death removes one of the rather striking personalities of the state, and the profession loses one of its worthy members and his own community a much beloved and respected citizen."

Supreme Court Adjourns

The supreme court adjourned its sitting this morning out of respect to the chief justice. All the judges will probably attend the funeral. The house of representatives and senate both appointed committees to draw up resolutions. According to the constitution, the governor will not appoint a chief justice to fill the vacancy until the next general election, 1916.

The body of Judge Hollenbeck was sent to Fremont at 1:40 this afternoon. No definite announcement was made of the funeral, but it probably will be held Monday, Burial will be at Fremont.

The following is from The Fremont Herald of Jan. 29, 1915

FUNERAL OBSEQUIES FOR THE LATE
SUPREME JUSTICE


The funeral of the late Hon. Conrad Hollenbeck, supreme justice of Nebraska, was held at the court house last Sunday afternoon, the court room being filled with friends and the hallways overflowing with scores who could not obtain seats within the court room. There were not only distinguished men present from all over the state, but many in the humbler walks of life were there to pay their respect to the memory of a splendid man and a loyal friend.

The body lay in a handsome casket, just before the bench from which the deceased had dispensed justice for sixteen years. Surrounding the casket was a sea of flowers and floral tributes, beautiful in their coloring and arrangement. The desk and tables occupying the front portion of the court room were also laden with beautiful offerings in the way of wreaths, special forms and bouquets of flowers. The members of tile supreme court, delegations from the house and senate, and prominent men of Nebraska were seated at the west side of the court room. A large delegation of women from the Fremont Charity club was seated within the enclosure that separates the court and attorneys from the apace occupied by visitors to the court room. The members of the Grand Army of the Republic and distinguished visitors from abroad also were seated at the front of the court room. while members of the Fremont bar sat near by.

The services began at 2:30 o’clock by the Rev. F. M. Sisson reading a portion of the Scriptures, uttering a prayer and then a brief address reciting the virtues and accomplishments of the deceased jurist. The services were then given in charge of the Grand Army of the, Republic, who conducted an impressive and pleasing ceremony. The services were simple and brief At the close the great mass of people slowly wended their way out of the building, the only music being the stately and solemn Chopin funeral march, which was played upon a piano by Prof. Schavland.

From the court house, the cortege moved to Ridge cemetery, where the final obsequies were held, earth closing the grave wherein lay all that was mortal of Conrad Hollenbeck, and the soldier-comrades sounding the final "taps" for their friend and neighbor.

The active pall bearers included District Judge F. W. Button, County Judge Waldo Wintersteen, County Attorney Sidner and Messrs., Mapes, Schurman, Vaughan, Allen Johnson and C. H. Christensen.

During the services at the court house the family of the deceased, together with relatives occupied the judge’s private room just north of the court room, and there heard the entire service. Among those from out of town present were Frank Hollenbeck, the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Hollenbeck, John Hollenbeck, of Salida, Colorado; Amos, of Trinidad, Colorado, brothers of the deceased, and Mrs. Clapp, of Steel City, Nebr., a sister of Judge Hollenbeck.

Newspaper Obituary Received from Potter County Pa. Historical Society.

February 17, 1927

Word received Tuesday morning, February 15th 1927 of death of Mrs. Nettie Hollenbeck at her home, Fremont Nebraska. she contracted grippe about two weeks ago which resulted in her death. Daughter of Franklin William and Catherine (Johnson) Knox. Born April 21, 1856 at the home of her grandmother and grandfather Johnson at Lisle, Broome county, N.Y. Brought to Coudersport when two months old where she lived during her girlhood. Received her education at the old academy on the hill and at a seminary for girls at Collegeville, Pennsylvania. On March 9, 1877 married Hon. Conrad Hollenbeck and left immediately for the West. After traveling for some time, located in Fremont, Neb. Had two children, Frank Knox Hollenbeck, now a lawyer in Fremont, and Oscar Lowry Hollenbeck who died in infancy. In 1888 Mrs. Hollenbeck came east and engaged in millinery business in Coudersport until the spring of 1894 when she sold her business to Miss A. Blanche Cummings and returned to Fremont. Is survived by one son and six grandchildren. One sister, Mrs. James G. Covey, of Coudersport; two brothers, James L. and Franklin D. Knox. Funeral February 17, at Fremont.

Descendants of Conrad Hollenbeck


1 Conrad Hollenbeck Died: in Potter County, Pennsylvania
+Rebecca Edwards Married: in Courtland County, New York
2 John Hollenbeck
+Emily Parker Born: in Virgil, Courtland County, New York
3 Conrad Hollenbeck Born: November 19, 1847 in East Hebron, Potter County, Pennsylvania Died: January 1915 in Nebraska
+Jannette Knox Born: April 21, 1856 in Lisle, Broome County, New York Married: May 09, 1877 in Coudersport, Pennsylvania Died: 1926-1927
4 Frank Knox Hollenbeck Born: June 18, 1878 in Fremont, Nebraska
+Mae B. Alexander
4 Oscar Lowry Hollenbeck Born: September 13, 1884 Died: December 01, 1885
3 Rebecca Hollenbeck Born: Abt 1853 in Pennsylvania
+Hammond Clapp Born: Abt 1838 in Ohio Married: August 03, 1873 in Jefferson County, Nebraska

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